Tagged "SDKMAN"

Links of the Presentation: What I Learned About OpenJDK As a Docs Writer

These are all the links of my presentation at the JChampions Conference, Monday January 29, 2024, 16:00 CET. What I Learned About OpenJDK As a Docs Writer As a teenager, a Commodore 64 and DIY solder kits ignited my passion for computers and electronics. But for some obscure reason, I chose an unexpected path by attending film school.

Running a CRaC Java application on Raspberry Pi - UPDATE

On July 15th of 2023, I published a post here about my initial experiments with CRaC on the Raspberry Pi. At that time, I found out that both the Linux kernel in Raspberry Pi OS and the Zulu Build of OpenJDK still needed some changes to work on the Raspberry Pi.

Links of the Presentation: Unlocking the Potential of Bits and Bytes

These are all the links of my presentation at Devoxx Belgium, Wednesday 12:00-12:50, Room 7. Unlocking the Potential of Bits and Bytes: Reducing Data Footprint for Cost and Eco-Efficiency In the age of unlimited storage space, we forget to consider the financial and ecological costs. Transmitting and storing data in XML, JSON, or (if you want to hurt people) YAML makes data human-readable, which is great for debugging and testing but is a very inefficient, heavy, and expensive way of handling data.

Running a CRaC Java application on Raspberry Pi

With the April release of the Zulu Build of OpenJDK, Azul announced the integration of CRaC in its version 17 of Java for Linux. Coordinated Restore at Checkpoint (CRaC) is a feature introduced in OpenJDK to improve Java’s application startup and warmup times to milliseconds from seconds or even minutes, by allowing a running application to pause, snapshot its state, and restart later, even on a different machine.

Installing Java with SDKMAN on Raspberry Pi

If you create a new SD card for a Raspberry Pi with the operating system, you can choose the “Raspberry Pi OS Full (32-bit)” edition, which includes Java 11. But a lot of the other available OS-versions don’t have Java included. There are many ways to install Java but, personally, I find SDKMAN the easiest one to use.